Haying 2014

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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  • #83473
    Ed Thayer
    Participant

    Anyone else getting anxious to cut hay. My orchard grass is all headed out and the clover is tall. We need some weather soon to get it in.

    Who was it that said, ” New England produces great grass, if only you could have the weather to harvest it.”

    Ed

    • This topic was modified 5 years, 9 months ago by Ed Thayer.
    #83476
    dominiquer60
    Moderator

    Moments like this is when it is handy to have a dairy herd to feed, it just has to wilt in order to put it in the silo 🙂

    We are chomping at the bit for 3-4 good days in a row, the orchard grass is already something that they pass up in the pasture. Thank goodness for our recent hay field renovations with late timothy, it seems to make a big difference in quality.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 9 months ago by dominiquer60.
    #83478
    Does’ Leap
    Participant

    “Anyone else getting anxious to cut hay?”

    Hey Ed, I am not anxious, but would welcome some hot sunny days. Keep in mind that it is very difficult to put up square bales this time of year. Even with a long, sunny stretch, high ground moisture, stem moisture, and lower temps are challenging. I have only made 1 crop of hay before June 1 in the past 5 years….barely.

    Good luck.

    George

    #83482
    Kevin Cunningham
    Participant

    Common wisdom around here is not to cut before Memorial day. It is too risky that bring said we already put 300 bales in the barn and it was some of the best hay we’ve had here. We got lucky this year.

    #83492
    PeytonM
    Participant

    even if I was ready to cut hay there no way it would be done, I think we got a good 2 inches of rain lastnight and last weekend we got over 5… its soggy places that were always dry no matter what are now wet… really wet..

    #83493
    dominiquer60
    Moderator

    First 23 acres are chopped and in the neighbors silo in trade for planting our corn. Sam is out tedding the first 5 acres for small squares, we need it badly for the horses. It is drying nicely though we are working it more that we normally would because the ground is so wet, but it is drying on schedule for baling tomorrow. It is almost 80 today and should be in the mid 80’s tomorrow. 36 last night, and I just planted tomatoes this morning, warm nights from here on out.

    #83494
    Ed Thayer
    Participant

    Glad you got some haying weather Erika. Looking forward to getting started here.

    #83498
    Ed Thayer
    Participant

    The neighbor dairy farm was tedding and raking green chop because it was so rank.

    We missed our ability to cut by 1 day. Hope next week looks better.

    #83499
    Mark Cowdrey
    Participant

    I would gladly trade the 2 2-day windows in the forecast for 1 3-day!

    #83516
    Kevin Cunningham
    Participant

    Not to rub it in but we got in another 100 bales of nice grain hay. I say this only to share the different cycles. CA is in the worst drought in decades which make for good hay weather but I had failures in my corn and buckwheat last season. I remember four years ago we had three inches and hail the first weekend in June. I wasn’t the only one to lose hay that year. Farmers are an optimistic lot. There’s always next year.

    #83588
    Ed Thayer
    Participant

    What do you think of the forecast ?

    Looks good after today through maybe Tuesday. The grass is so thick I question whether it would dry in 2.5 days?

    I have a neighbors field that is thinner than mine and think it might be OK to try that. Frustrating year for hay everywhere I think.

    ED

    #83589
    Does’ Leap
    Participant

    We are going to start cutting in the rain today and probably finish mowing tomorrow. It is a narrow window, but the further the season progresses without optimal weather, the more chances I am willing to take. I have tedded as much as 3x daily in conditions like this and have done OK. We have Sat-Mon looking good with 40% chance of rain Monday night.

    George

    #83592
    dominiquer60
    Moderator

    We are going to cut in the morning even if raining. We hate to take the risk, but we hate to see is go by, with 100 acres we should get enough decent feed for ourselves. We have cut twice so far with 700 safe in the loft. The crop has been very light and varies a lot field to field and within the fields. The last 2 fields generally make 3 loads stacked well above the top of the wagon, this year they only brought 2 loads, not quite full to the top of the wagon.

    #83600
    Ed Thayer
    Participant

    We are going to hold off, the weather is just not going to cooperate. I sought the advice of a couple respected hay makers here and neither of them are cutting yet.

    Networking with them made up my mind.

    Good luck to the rest of you,

    #83611
    Ed Thayer
    Participant

    I could not stand the anticipation any longer, I cut on Saturday afternoon after the sun decided to show. Glad I did, I tedded 2 times today and the grass is drying great in this wind and sun.

    Will ted a couple times tomorrow and hopefully get it baled early Tuesday before the possible thunderstorms.

    Ed

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By Ed Thayer

The Fletcher Family Farm in East Washington, New Hampshire has been in operation for five generations. Currently owned by Ed and Jane Thayer, the farm is a self-sustaining homestead that raises pork, chicken, beef and turkey, grows green vegetables, potatoes, corn and pumpkins and produces 110 gallons of maple syrup annually. All animals are raised free range in movable paddocks and whenever possible work is done with draft animal power.

Why Homesteading?

For us, homesteading is simply making the best use of the resources that we have at our fingertips ... specifically our land. We're reconnecting with the food chain.
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Natural Processes

Wheather it's discing the garden with the horses, raising grass-fed livestock or canning vegetables for the winter, the more we can do the good old fashioned way the better!

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