This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  plainsman 3 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #96119

    plainsman
    Participant

    I’ve talked to a few people who’ve worked oxen quite a bit (several years total with them) asking them about oxen speed when driven from behind in a cart or wagon. The ones who’ve owned Devons said if it was wanted they could walk with horses. Can any of the other breeds such as longhorns or brahmans match their speed? I’m interested more in moving hay or hauling water with them in wagons and some light farming. The hauls would be up to two or three miles one way. My knees are shot and I don’t intend to walk when I can ride so I’d like something that could step out if the loads were light. I had a man who had had and liked both horses and oxen tell me to stick with horses or mules but I would like to try a yoke of oxen. Any ideas or opinions out there?

    Bryan

    #96120

    carl ny
    Participant

    I’m not a oxen person so I might be prejudice but I would have to agree with the man that said to stick with horses. Field work might be fine with oxen but not road work. Hauling on the road with horses you can trot right a long and do the work in a fraction of the time of oxen. I don’t think I have ever seen an oxen trot… This is all JMHO..

    #96146

    dominiquer60
    Moderator

    Milking Devons and Jersey are quick but smart, sometimes too smart, never let them get away with something they shouldn’t just once. Sam had a pair of roan Milking Shorthorns that would out walk his father’s Percherons on the way home from the woodlot with a load. It all depends on the pair and teamster. They biggest problem with commuting with oxen are keeping their feet healthy, they can wear down fast in the right conditions and some animals are more prone to stone bruising than others. Gravel roads can be torture for some without shoes. Mine Shorthorns avoided gravel lanes as much as possible but would go at a good clip in soil or sod.
    Erika

    #96147

    plainsman
    Participant

    Thanks to both of you for the replies! The men I knew who worked horses have passed on and I never knew any ox drovers. Now the internet and phone calls are about my only source for information. I’ve run searches on old threads and it appears the ones who used to post a lot have left the forums. I’m glad to see a couple of you are still around.

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